Favourite 3 tools

wildebus

Forum Member
On my recent electrics rejigging, obviously used a bunch of various tools, but there were 3 specific ones that I found invaluable and would have been a lot more awkward without these. Not impossible by any means, but they definately made life easier.


1. Bosch Pushdrive Electric Screwdriver

This is a brilliant tool. When working in confined spaces it is significantly easier to use than a drill with a screwdriver bit. Pretty powerful unit and the key feature is there is no on/off switch - you just push it down to start it (to both screw in and to undo).
I bought it a couple of years ago and still works great. Holds its charge really well and the recharging is done using USB and a Micro-USB cable, just like many tablets and phones.
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2. IWISS SN Ratcheting Crimper Tool Set with 5 Quick Changing Dies

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I have numerous Crimping Tools (got to be into Double Figures) but this one is probably my Favourite one. Feels nice in the hand, and is perfect for making the little crimps on connectors such as the Tyco Mate-N-Lok pins, when you need something light to use but powerful at the same time.
What is nice about this IWISS set is you can change the dies without needing the usual screwdriver to undo the screws, change the die and then put the screw back in. You also get a Die set for the MC4 solar connector pins, which is very handy.
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The set comes with Wire Strippers as well. I don't tend to use the strippers as have others I prefer, but I have used them occasionally and they do work fine - and if they were the ones to hand, have no problem in using them.




3. Bosch EasyCut

Now this 3rd tool may seem a bit of a gimmick, and the reviews on Amazon are quite mixed (and I think some folk maybe don't understand what they have actually bought?). The pictures on the listing show it being used cutting branches and thick planks, but again, like the PushDriver, using in confined spaces is where this excels.

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This is basically a mini-chainsaw, but you can use it in a much more flexible way than a jigsaw and I found works better than the MultiTool I have and would have used previously.


So building a Camper needs a whole bunch of tools, but these three are ones I really find makes the job easier and faster. What are your 3 favourites?
 

DnK

Forum Member
On my current build I decided cordless was the route. Being an old school Carpenter & Joiner it now amazes me how easy they have it now. Milwaukee M18 my weapons of choice. I bought the drill and impact driver first on a deal from screwfix, then bought the naked jig saw and then the naked skill saw/track saw. Obviously not three but 4 tools running from 2 batteries. They have stood up to the task and I'd recommend them. Another amazing tool is the Kreg pocket hole tool, ifd your on a build you need one of these.
 

SquirrellCook

Forum Member
On my current build I decided cordless was the route. Being an old school Carpenter & Joiner it now amazes me how easy they have it now. Milwaukee M18 my weapons of choice. I bought the drill and impact driver first on a deal from screwfix, then bought the naked jig saw and then the naked skill saw/track saw. Obviously not three but 4 tools running from 2 batteries. They have stood up to the task and I'd recommend them. Another amazing tool is the Kreg pocket hole tool, ifd your on a build you need one of these.
I bought an electric screw driver about 30 years ago, it was an expensive waste of money. Put me off for life. I have no problem spending money, but it must do the job you paid for.
 

Deleted member 12559

Not so much for home conversion application, more takeaway.
I take this otherwise redundant Bosch ex. 12v battery powered drill everywhere I travel, 'adapted' to plug into the vans's 12v sockets.. Everlasting power as long as the sun shines! Negligible weight & enough power to wind a 200kg motorbike in/out on its sliding rack.

Favourite Tools 020.JPG
 

wildebus

Forum Member
Not so much for home conversion application, more takeaway.
I take this otherwise redundant Bosch ex. 12v battery powered drill everywhere I travel, 'adapted' to plug into the vans's 12v sockets.. Everlasting power as long as the sun shines! Negligible weight & enough power to wind a 200kg motorbike in/out on its sliding rack.

View attachment 4635
That's an interesting idea and revamps a tool which maybe the batteries are no longer any use and maybe not worth buying (or available).

I am surprised you can get enough current out of a 12V Accessory socket as they are generally only rated at upto 120W - the drill must be 3 x that or more? (I like using the Anderson 50A Connectors for 'roving' accessories).
 

wildebus

Forum Member
On my current build I decided cordless was the route. Being an old school Carpenter & Joiner it now amazes me how easy they have it now. Milwaukee M18 my weapons of choice. I bought the drill and impact driver first on a deal from screwfix, then bought the naked jig saw and then the naked skill saw/track saw. Obviously not three but 4 tools running from 2 batteries. They have stood up to the task and I'd recommend them. Another amazing tool is the Kreg pocket hole tool, ifd your on a build you need one of these.
I've got two"families" of Cordless Tools I guess...

First one is the Ryobi One+ 18V kit. Started with the Ni-Cad versions in 2007 (bought a bunch of different tools from Home Depot in the US - much cheaper then the UK Prices at the time, especially with the $2 =£1 exchange rate) and when the Li-on batteries came on board, they made them compatible so can still use the original tools from nearly 15 years ago.
Drill, Drill-Driver, Hammer Drill, Angle Drill, Impact Driver, Router, Grass Strimmer, Hedge Cutter, Torch, Work Light, Wet & Dry Vacuum - and even a Radio!. I did have the Circular Saw and Jigsaw originally but they were useless with the NiCads so sold on. Probably work well with the Lithiums though!

Second group is the Bosch 12V "For All" kit. Lighter-weight kit but still very usable and ideal for more portable use (useful if I went away to do some work). As well as the mini-Chainsaw in the first post, got a Jigsaw and Drill, plus a small vacuum (keep in the van) and Torch, plus the Batteries are compatible and interchangable with the 10.8V range on an earlier Bosch range and the same that the battery Dremel uses.


I bought an electric screw driver about 30 years ago, it was an expensive waste of money. Put me off for life. I have no problem spending money, but it must do the job you paid for.
I've had a couple of other Electric Screwdrivers in the past and they have been overall not very useful. But Li-on battery tech on cordless tools really has been a game changer in terms of usability and power and an electric screwdriver today is a world away from anything you might have been able to buy 30 years ago.
The Bosch PushDriver I posted a link to is little different to using a normal screwdriver except you have so much extra power and torque, and if space is tight you can just hold the end with a thumb and forefinger - and the battery lasts for ages! I have never once HAD to recharge it (i.e. gone dead on me when using).

I stick it on a charge very occasionally as I think to myself 'surely it must need a recharge soon' but never actually needed it. Unlike the Ni-Cad power tools which would last less then an hour in use often and would self-drain within weeks so things like the orginal electric screwdrivers would often be dead when you go to use them :(
 

Deleted member 12559

That's an interesting idea and revamps a tool which maybe the batteries are no longer any use and maybe not worth buying (or available).

I am surprised you can get enough current out of a 12V Accessory socket as they are generally only rated at upto 120W - the drill must be 3 x that or more? (I like using the Anderson 50A Connectors for 'roving' accessories).

That Bosch model is 14.4V I set it at 2 or 3 on the 1 to 5 torque setting, that usually saves the 10A fuse. I have a 25A dedicated external socket wired directly back to the leisure batteries for likely max. power tasks.

Another favourite, although not strictly a 'conversion stage' tool.
Brake pipe bubble flaring tool, works very well with Kunifer, not so with Steel.
Actually what was once a favourite tool to me , nowadays seems to be to be more a favourite
tool (+my time) of friends and family, I'm getting more than cheesed off replacing corroded brakelines!
Pulley for pipe bending also shown, although Kunifer can be bent to a reasonable radius by hand.Favourite Tools 017.JPG
 

Deleted member 12559

Another favourite tool is ye 25 year olde MIG welder, invaluable for the
handful of van conversions I've carried out.
Due to Mercede's policy of not selling their specialist tools to private individuals.....b**t**ds
I was compelled into making my own version of the rear castellated axle nut /torquing tool with the MIG welder, from a MB photo of their tool ex. Mild steel, but strong enough to do the job (250Nm final torque). Possibly my most favourite tool of favoured tools Lol.



Axle Tool 002.JPG
Axle Tool 002.JPG
 
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Deleted member 12559

Coincidentally I was going to put that UT210E Clamp Meter up as a favourite, Appears to me it really is
a universally favoured tool/instrument. If I have a gripe about it is the display illumination duration could do
with being longer, or even adjustable, but for c.£34 couldn't realistically expect more. Hang on yes I could,
perfect if it could measure Amps when clamped over twin core !! :cool:
 
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