Violating a Princess!

GEOFF

Full Member
I did seriously look into converting my SG windows using a spacer frame and inner panel. When I checked on the legality I was informed that both cab and hab glazing would have to be approved and marked with the official euromark. I was also told that acrylic and polycarbonate was not allowed, although there is a process (very expensive) to make poly acceptable. I did ask how Seitz managed to get approval, but did not get an answer. My info came from one of the UK's major vehicle glass manufacturers. Geoff.
 

SquirrellCook

Full Member
That seems very odd Geoff, lots of motor homes have plastic windows.
A later version of the plaxton cheetah has double glazing so that could be worth looking into.
 

Millie Master

Full Member
And @GEOFF there are countless thousands of kit cars and competition cars that are used on a day to day basis onthe public roads, fitted with perspex windows. The Cooper S's and various Escorts I had in my competition days all had prespex side and back windows and were all used on the open road quite legally.

And as Mark so rightly comments, all cravans and most motorhomes have plastic windows of some type or kind.

Phil
 

GEOFF

Full Member
Absolutely correct Phil, as In said in my post Seitz windows are plastic/acrylic, but they do carry the correct markings. When I was looking into it I spoke to the main UK vehicle glass manufacturer about it and they assured me that it was strictly forbidden to use any vehicle forward or side facing fenestration without the correct E marking. They also told me that they supply a well known taxicab manufacturer with glass and their customer had requested additional (secondary) glazing for their internal cad/passenger compartment, and the regulations prevented even that. If you cast your mind back on the old website I did say that I was thinking of DG'ing my flush glass, not because "C" was a problem, but because I could. Any vehicle presenting for MOT would be failed "if" the tester realised that the glazing - internal or external was not approved and properly marked. Geoff.
 

Millie Master

Full Member
Bloody hell @GEOFF that reads like big brother or the infernal EU meddlesome meddlers (with nothing to do apart from sticking their noses into other business) have found something else to while away their days!

Phil
 

RV2MAX

Full Member
This glazing e mark issue may be coming about due to the vehicle still being a psv until changed in logbook .
There are very stringent glass requirements in all areas of PSV . this is not the case AFAIK in IVA
so other than cab windows as here
45 Safety Glass Application: All Vehicles Method of InspectionRequired StandardCheck that all windscreens, windows, and side screens are securely attached to the vehicle and are constructed from approved materials.Clear panels, not made of glass,fitted to the vehicle that do not impinge on the forward, rearward or sideward view of the driver are considered to be body panels and are not subject to the requirements of this section.
So hab section can have plastic HTSH BTW for MOT tester does not check for glazing markings only Class 5 , not RFF in 3 4 7
 
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SquirrellCook

Full Member
This weekends sufferings in the heat.

All welding completed in the wheel arch area and the removed structure replaced.
Everything sealed to prevent further ingress of water from that area. The down side is that it's also one less drain for the other leaks!
Brake pipe replaced, new brake disc and pads. The hub was washed along with it's bearings. No damaged found so greased and fitted again.
First time bleeding air assisted hydraulic brakes, so much easier that vacuum brakes.
Spotted that another job will be antiroll bar bushes soon too.

Tomorrow if all goes to plan we hope to replace a leaking air bag.
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SquirrellCook

Full Member
No beautifying this time, I just wanted to get the bag changed to prove that as my major source of air loss. Sod working in this heat as well!
Was a bit worrying as the Mercedes info I read on changing it kept on about the risk of being crushed and death! So I made to aluminium blocks to hold the chassis of the axel as I let the air out. And for good measure I left the jack in place I used to increase my working clearance. A future pain will be getting someone with the box of tricks to set the body height and level.

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SquirrellCook

Full Member
I must admit this build feels more like demolition at the moment. There is a lot to be said for converting a donor vehicle and ignoring as much as possible. I have to admit I was one of those people. As both my previous conversions were in desperation with limited funds and resources, I later paid the price by having to destroy good to repair hidden problems. Today a big hole has been filled and the engine bay is finally isolated from the habitation area. The underside is sound insulated and the top has had the same treatment. A decorative panel covers this, and this is all it had.
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SquirrellCook

Full Member
After replacing a suspension air bag for the first time and then discovering multiple other leaks I was somewhat disheartened. Lots more expense and hopefully reclaiming some fittings, I should have the bits to rebuild it. The steel dog bones, banjo bolts and nuts were bead blasted free of rust and then electro zinc plated with yellow passivation (zinc n yellow) The first stumbling block is I haven't cleaned and painted the areas that have been exposed by the disassembly. Second, if I did rebuild it I can test it. As some of the local scum stole the diesel. Lastly I'm not allowed to play outside until my leg heals! :(
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n brown

Full Member
on buses i've done i've found the windows too big generally , so i'd normally leave the ones nearest the front, then sheet over the rest. making a batten frame is easy , and you can put smaller windows where you choose to have them. and glass is pretty heavy too. much better ,i think , to have plenty of wall space
 

SquirrellCook

Full Member
on buses i've done i've found the windows too big generally , so i'd normally leave the ones nearest the front, then sheet over the rest. making a batten frame is easy , and you can put smaller windows where you choose to have them. and glass is pretty heavy too. much better ,i think , to have plenty of wall space
From memory we are loosing 5 pieces of glass, and the body being reinforced where the big pains are removed. Where the glass is removed painted aluminium panels will be bonded in to simulate the glass and maintain it's look. Now that it's getting cold and wet my glass man may not be happy to undertake it this year :( The existing glass is only just below worktop level so that is good.
 

SquirrellCook

Full Member
Finally managed to crawl underneath and fit the air suspension again. Cleaning and painting will have to wait until the weather is better.

Big question … Air Door!
I was planning on repairing the system that operates the air door. Is it necessary? The door functions as a normal swing door with the hoses disconnected. I guess with the cylinder removed it will be lighter?
Each time the door is used air is used, so that could be a pain parked up.
What do you think, would it just be an annoying gimmick or a must have?
 

wildebus

Full Member
Finally managed to crawl underneath and fit the air suspension again. Cleaning and painting will have to wait until the weather is better.

Big question … Air Door!
I was planning on repairing the system that operates the air door. Is it necessary? The door functions as a normal swing door with the hoses disconnected. I guess with the cylinder removed it will be lighter?
Each time the door is used air is used, so that could be a pain parked up.
What do you think, would it just be an annoying gimmick or a must have?
personally ... if/while it works, fine. If it needs fixing ... lose it! It is a must have for a Bus Driver of course, but in an Motorhome? no way.
It is a bit like the Electric Sliding Doors in the Top Spec of the VW Caravelle ... looks cool, but when they go wrong (and they all do), just about everyone wants to loose them.
 

Bouydog

Full Member
Finally managed to crawl underneath and fit the air suspension again. Cleaning and painting will have to wait until the weather is better.

Big question … Air Door!
I was planning on repairing the system that operates the air door. Is it necessary? The door functions as a normal swing door with the hoses disconnected. I guess with the cylinder removed it will be lighter?
Each time the door is used air is used, so that could be a pain parked up.
What do you think, would it just be an annoying gimmick or a must have?
I removed mine and with the mechanism they were really heavy, my biggest concerns with them were weather seal and security. The closed fit was quite poor and I could not see a way of making them secure enough to deter unwelcome visitors.
 

SquirrellCook

Full Member
The plaxton door should be a good fit once it's aligned properly. Murky folding electric doors work well and has a good lock. I did start to make a drop bar for the doors then decided it was over kill. The weather seal does not look wonderful, but you don't get any bad drafts. The way I wired the alarm system into it the doors automatically shut after two touches of the brake pedal. When you turn the engine off they open. Can be inhibited too with a switch on the dash.
 

SquirrellCook

Full Member
I don’t expect I’ll get much more done this year. Again more demolition. I knew from the wheel arch repair there was hidden horrors, and the only answer was to remove the step. I also expected issues with the back lower door frame that was also hidden. To some it may look horrendous, but I’m surprised it’s so good. I am going to have to make a new lower door pivot plate as it does not have enough adjustment to align the door. With any luck the step that covered the door ram, will be the new D4 eberspacher home.
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