Gas regulations / best practise

#1
Hi all.

Now that I've understood how I'm going to do the electrics I'm now begining to plan for a gas cooker.

Please can someone point me to what regulations I have to adhere to?
Also any best practise that may be over and above the regulations.

Just one calor cylinder and one simple gas cooker.

Many thanks

Tim
 

n brown

Full Member
#2
far as i know there are no regs but your insurance company may have their own specs.however,if your bottle is well secured in its own cupboard and you have a short length of flexi orange hose going to a 8mm bulkhead pigtail and the rest of the installation is done in 8mm copper pipe,fixed well to the walls,and you drill dropout holes of 40mm under each joint,unless they're close together,and at least one in the bottle cupboard you've made a good start
 
#3
http://www.a-tconsulting.co.uk/caravan_tech/regs.html
 

Firefox

#4
Gas bottle container should be lined in metal and sealed, drop out holes in floor of gas bottle container. Gas bottle secured with straps. Last 500mm of hose to regulator can be rubber, thereafter copper with compression joints to appliance after isolation tap on a bulkhead. Fit regulator and maybe pressure gauge on bottle. Pressure test system for leaks before use.
 

ellisboy

#5
Gas drop out holes near to every appliance.
 

channa

Full Member
#6
En1949 is the standard to work to, En1949 also spawned other standards regarding pipe sizing , ventilaton. Hoses and regulators etc.

Not as simple as fitting 8 mm pipe everywhere, and supporting piping has minimum distances to adhere to etc

En1949 replaces the old British standard
Bs5482 part 2 1977 if my Memory isn't failing

Channa
 

n brown

Full Member
#7
are we talking regulations here,as in you get fined if you don't stick to them,or standards of practice,no legal standing?
 
#8
Many thanks everyone. That gives me something to work on.

tim
 

channa

Full Member
#10
n brown:177963 said:
are we talking regulations here,as in you get fined if you don't stick to them,or standards of practice,no legal standing?
Standards that your vehicle is probably uninsurable as it doesn't comply with current regulations per se.

I personally see little point in expending effort installing a gas system which will cause consternation with insurers and certainly fail a safety certificate if requested.

FWIW my observations are from the standpoint of a fully qualified lpg gas engineer in leisure accommodation vehicles.....who as part of my work issues safety certificates.

Channa
 
#11
ta for that.what i'm trying to establish is,whether its right or wrong,that you are legally allowed to do your own gasfitting on your van.now while i agree that there may be some truly dreadful and amateur gasfitting going on out there,it is only fair to inform people that they are legally allowed to do it. i know its dangerous,but mainly to the perpetrator,unlike really bad drivers being allowed to drive large fast heavy vehicles.so you can do your own gas,12v,240v and water on your own van,and may you retain the right to do so
 
#12
yeah well i'm not advocating doing anything yourself if you're not feeling competent,but if you know what the parameters are,if you're informed of the facts,then and only then you can make a decision.this is what i'm saying,freedom of choice based on facts,not supposition
 

Harmergeddon

#13
My insurance does not require my gas or electrics to be fitted by a qualified person or for any certification. Also there is no way i would trust my life in the hands of another with regards to the electrics and gas, so i have fitted and checked all of my own installation to a standard that i am happy with. Gas and electrics are both potential killers and as such need to be treated with caution.
 

channa

Full Member
#14
To answer n browns question I don't think there is any law which prevents self installation


The potential problem occurs upon sale, or should a qualified engineer identify a problem

Channa
 

channa

Full Member
#15
Harmergeddon:178088 said:
My insurance does not require my gas or electrics to be fitted by a qualified person or for any certification. Also there is no way i would trust my life in the hands of another with regards to the electrics and gas, so i have fitted and checked all of my own installation to a standard that i am happy with. Gas and electrics are both potential killers and as such need to be treated with caution.
which is why the health and safety exec bestow a legal duty upon gas engineers in repect of riddor to act upon a system that is unsafe or doesn't comply with current regs
This can vary from a simple advisory to reporting direct to the h&s dependant upon the extent of the defect.

Channa
 

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